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Doomed to fail?- Leeds sack David Hockaday after shambolic start to the season

As featured on NewsNow: Football news    eNewsletter

It was no great surprise when Leeds United announced that Head Coach David Hockaday has been sacked by Italian owner Massimo Cellino.

And it wasn't because the previous weekend Cellino announced that he had sacked him then changed his mind after their 4-1 defeat to Watford.

The lack of surprise has been building and building amongst fans and pundits since Hockaday was first brought to the club, having only previously managed non league side Forest Green Rovers.

With the emphasis made by appointing him 'head coach' as opposed to manager, Cellino has made it clear that he expects the man in charge of his first team not to have a say in transfer matters.

For Hockaday, this was the opportunity of a lifetime and he was more than happy to surrender his say in transfer matters for a chance to manage such a huge club.

None could blame him for accepting the job, but his abilities at Championship level were quickly and brutally exposed as he lost three of his four league matches.

After only a couple of games the feeling that he had to win the next match to save his job was growing, and after being thrashed by Watford 4-1 last weekend fans were already expecting his departure.

And indeed Cellino delivered it, only to prolong the agony by changing his mind, as though the decision was as trivial to him as deciding what to eat a restaurant.

But after Leeds picked up their 4th red card in 6 games against local rivals Bradford in the League Cup, only to take an unlikely lead and then lose 2-1, Cellino knew what the order of the day was.

Speaking of the decision, Cellino said: "The results since the start of the season have meant we needed to act and make this decision."

"After the defeat at Bradford I realised that my decision to keep David at the club following the defeat at Watford was wrong, and I had to change my mind on the coach's position."

"As a club we will now begin our search for a new head coach."

Cellino's maverick approach to running a football club has both amused and bemused at times, with his outlandish, but honest, demeanour giving the impression that Leeds, a club no stranger to controversy, has some intriguing times ahead of it.

Hockaday's appointment and inevitable failure has to be put on Cellino, as will who he decides to appoint next. His record in Italy of having 35 managers in 20 years however would be enough to put even the most straight talking managers in doubt.

Several pundits have jokingly suggested that Cellino should take charge himself and see how hard it is, but should he continue to play managerial chairs, then he may be left with no other option.

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